Flowers from Shakespeare’s Garden

Publisher:  Maar-sha Publishing Co., Ltd.,   2006

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Title Page, 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

O Proserpina, For the flowers now, that, frighted, thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon! (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take. The winds of March with beauty; (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Or Cytherea's breadth (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bight Phoebus in his strength--a malady Most incident to maids; (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

bold oxlips, and (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The Crown-imperial (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

lilies of all kinds (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The flower-de-luce being one! (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Here's flowers for you; (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Hot lavender, (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

mints, (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

savoury, marjoram; (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun, And with him rises weeping; (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The fairest flowers o' the season. Are our carnations, (The Winter's Tale), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

She went to the garden for parsley (The Taming of the Shrew), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Their lips were four red roses on a stalk, Which in their summer beauty kiss'd each other. (RICHARD III), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Enter Ophelia, fantastically dressed with straws and flowers. (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

and there is pansies, that's for thoughts. (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

There's fennel for you, (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

and columbines: (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

there's rue for you; and here's some for me: we may call it, herb-grace o' Sundays: (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

There's a daisy: (Hamlet), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, (A Midsummer Night's Dream), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, (A Midsummer Night's Dream), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

With sweet musk-roses, (A Midsummer Night's Dream), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

and with eglantine., 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

CERES, most bounteous lady, thy rich leas Of wheat, rye, barley, (The Tempest), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Allons! allons! Sow'd cockle reap'd no corn. (Love's Labours Lost), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The azured harebell, like thy veins. (Cymbeline), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Larksheels trim (The Two Noble Kinsmen), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Get you some of this distilled Carduus Benedictus, and lay it to your heart; - Why Benedictus? You have some moral in this Benedictus Moral! No, by my troth, I have no moral meaning. I meant. plain Holy Thistle (Much Ado About Nothing), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The female ivy so Enrings the barky fingers of the elm. (A Midsummer Night's Dream), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The strawberry grows underneath the nettle, And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best Neighbour'd by fruit of baser quality (Henry V), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Gives not the hawthorn-bush a sweeter shade To shepherds looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings that fear their subjects' treachery? (3 Henry VI), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries (1 Henry IV), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Heigh-ho, sing heigh-ho, unto the green holly (As You Like It), 1906

Walter Crane (1845-1915)

Prerogative of age, crowns, sceptres, laurels. (Troilus and Cressida), 1906



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  • public domain mark
  • These works are in the public domain in Japan because it has been over 50 years since the author's death as of the effective date of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (December 30, 2018).

    ※ These works may not be in the public domain in other countries outside Japan.
  • frag of japan