Kay Nielsen

Publisher:  A Peacock Press/Bantam Book,   1975

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“Well, mind and hold tight by my shaggy coat, and then there's nothing to fear,” said the Bear, so she rode a long, long way (East of the Sun and West of the Moon)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“Tell me the way, then,” she said, “and I'll search you out” (East of the Sun and West of the Moon)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

And then she lay on a little green patch in the midst of the gloomy thick wood (East of the Sun and West of the Moon)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

No sooner had he whistled than he heard a whizzing and a whirring from all quarters, and such a large flock of birds swept down that they blackened all the field in which they settled (The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The lad in the bear's skin and the King of Arabia's daughter (The Blue Belt)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

She saw the Lindworm for the first time as he came in and stood by her side (Prince Lindworm)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

She could not help setting the door a little ajar, just to peep in, when - Pop! out flew the Moon (The Lassie and Her Godmother)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

Then he coaxed her down and took her home (The Lassie and Her Godmother)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“Here are your children; now you shall have them again. I am the Virgin Mary.” (The Lassie and Her Godmother)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

He too saw the image in the water; but he looked up at once, and became aware of the lovely Lassie who sat there up in the tree (The Lassie and Her Godmother)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“You'll come to three Princesses, whom you will see standing in the earth up to their necks, with only their heads out” (The Three Princesses of Whiteland)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

So the man gave him a pair of snow shoes (The Three Princesses of Whiteland)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The six brothers riding out to woo (The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“On that island stands a church; in that church is a well; in that well swims a duck.” (The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

When he had walked a day or so, a strange man met him. “Whither away?” asked the man (The Widow's Son)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

But still the Horse begged him to look behind him (The Widow's Son)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

And this time she whisked off the wig; and there lay the lad, so lovely, and white and red, just as the Princess had seen him in the morning sun (The Widow's Son)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

Just as they bent down to take the rose a big dense snow-drift came and carried them away (The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

As soon as they tugged at the rope, the Captain and the Lieutenant pulled up the Princesses, the one after the other (The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

And there on a throne all covered with black sat the Iron King (Minon-Minette)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

List, ah, list to the zephyr in the grove! Where beneath the happy boughs Flora builds her summerhouse: Whist! Ah, whist! While the cushat tells his love. (Felicia or The Pot of Pinks )

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

Felicia thereupon stepped forth, and terrified though she was, saluted the Queen respectfully: with so graceful a curtsey (Felicia or The Pot of Pinks )

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“The good Fairy placed her own baby in a cradle of roses and gave command to the Zephyrs to carry him to the Tower” (Felicia or The Pot of Pinks )

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The Princesses on the way to the dance (The Twelve Dancing Princesse)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“I have had such a terrible dream,” she declared. “.... a pretty bird swooped down, snatched it from my hands and flew away with it” (Rosanie or The Inconstant Prince)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

A look—a kiss—and he was gone (Rosanie or The Inconstant Prince)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

And the mirror told him that his was indeed the withered face and form (The Man Who Never Laughed)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“Your soul!—My soul!” they kept saying in hollow tones, according as they won or lost (John and the Ghosts)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

“Don't drink!” cried out the little Princess, springing to her feet; “I would rather marry a gardener!” (The Twelve Dancing Princesse)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

And they built a crystal coffin (Snow White)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The Cottage was built of bread and cake (Hansel and Gretel)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

He recognised the fair Cerise (Cerise, or the Married Frog)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

His wife was seated on a golden throne (The Fisherman and his wife)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The Prince knelt down and gave her a kiss (Sleeping Beauty)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

Blow, blow light winds! (The Goosegirl)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The King could not find her (Noir de Fumée)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

He struck the ground angrily with his right foot (Saute-Menu)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

The Unicom drove her horn into the tree (The Brave Little Tailor)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

Six white swans were flying high in the sky (The White Swans)

Kay Nielsen (1886-1957)

Out of the fire jumped a little bird (The Juniper Tree)



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  • public domain mark
  • These works are in the public domain in Japan because it has been over 50 years since the author's death as of the effective date of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (December 30, 2018).

    ※ These works may not be in the public domain in other countries outside Japan.
  • frag of japan